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Resultaten getoond voor 'Tenpaku Ward, Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture'

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Yoshoku Restaurant
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Japanese Restaurant
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“Okonomiyaki (お好み焼き o-konomi-yaki?) (About this sound listen (help·info)) is a Japanese savoury pancake containing a variety of ingredients. The name is derived from the word okonomi, meaning "what you like" or "what you want", and yaki meaning "grilled" or "cooked" (cf. yakitori and yakisoba). Okonomiyaki is mainly associated with the Kansai or Hiroshima areas of Japan, but is widely available throughout the country. Toppings and batters tend to vary according to region. Tokyo okonomiyaki is usually smaller than a Hiroshima or Kansai okonomiyaki.”
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“Japanese-style Fried Chicken Tebasaki is deep-fried chicken wingtips. Once tasted, it is never forgotten. The spicy flavor also goes very well with beer or Sake Japanese rice wine. A tebasaki expert would eat up the wingtip by crunching the cartilage. Yet, the taste is not only for adults. Tebasaki-flavored ice cream and snacks have become available recently, and tebasaki is now a choice for take-home gifts from Nagoya. Traditionally, breast, thigh, and sasami (breast tenderloin) have been popular portions of chicken, while drumsticks and wingtips did not have much use. Only two wingtips are taken from one chicken, and they have little meat. Wingtips had little use, being used as a soup stock at best. So, they were cheap. Ordinarily, chicken is fried after being dipped in a batter of flour or potato starch. In the Nagoya style, however, the wingtips are seasoned beforehand and then fried without batter. First, wingtips are fried to 80% done at a relatively low oil temperature (about 150°c), then they are moved to a higher temperature oil (180°c-190°c) for a crisp finish. Finally, the wingtips are basted with sauce on both sides while being turned, seasoned with salt and pepper, and coated with white sesame seeds. Please contact each restaurant for more details.”
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“Grilled Eel on Rice Though eel may be instantly associated with Hamana-ko Lake, Shizuoka Prefecture, its top production area is actually Aichi Prefecture. Eel is slit open along the belly and grilled whole without steaming - that's the Nagoya style of cooking eel. Hitsumabushi is a local eel dish, which is said to have originated at the end of Meiji Era as waitresses dished up each serving of chopped grilled eel on rice from a large wooden tub for keeping cooked rice (o-hitsu) into individual bowls of customers in a tatami-mat room. The eating procedure is also unique. To begin with, the whole eel dish is divided into four portions. You put the first portion into your bowl and enjoy as it is; then you put the second helping in and put on some condiments (wasabi horseradish, nori dried laver, mitsuba trefoil, etc.) to your taste. The basic spice combination is chopped green onions, grated wasabi, and nori seaweed sheet cut into pieces, which go well with grilled eel. Enjoy the changes in tastes. Then you have the third portion in the same manner as the second portion plus green tea or broth poured over it, like o-chazuke soup with rice. And, finally, you can enjoy the remaining portion repeating one of the three methods you liked best!”
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Restaurant
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